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Who should be inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame next

On April 22, the Country Music Hall of Fame will announce its 2014 inductees. Here’s who I think should be inducted into the Modern Era category (eligible artists had to have his/her/their breakthrough between 1969 and 1994).

Male Artists:

  • Alan Jackson
  • Gene Watson
  • John Conlee
  • Randy Travis
  • Ronnie Milsap

Female Artists:

  • Anne Murray
  • Crystal Gayle
  • Linda Ronstadt
  • Olivia Newton-John
  • Tanya Tucker

Groups and Duos

  • The Bellamy Brothers
  • The Judds
  • The Kendalls
  • Larry Gatlin & The Gatlin Brothers
  • The Oak Ridge Boys

msbeautifulsorta:

Landlords Stole My Records Off The Street “To me a record shop isn’t a “specialist” shop , or a thrift store either, it’s just a kind of shop, a very important kind of shop. Record shops were meeting places where you learnt about music, clothes, style and clubs. Everyone in my town who was interesting was in the record shop at some point. There’s so much talk about the death of vinyl versus the download boom as if we all fled away from records because we love our iPods too much, but that isn’t exactly the whole story. One of the main reasons why vinyl sales have declined is because when we walk down our streets we don’t see any. The greed of local councils and lease owning landlords has meant that our towns and cities have replaced the record shops (and clothes shops) we all liked with over priced sandwich shops and Bistro Bars.
All through the nineties stores that were rented and run by enthusiasts of say, photography and cameras, as well as music, got totally priced out of their premises and livelihoods, and our culture, by councils and landlords with The Next Quid and Starbucks Dollar in their eyes, it wasn’t all the fault of The Megabyte and Pixel, and now what’s left ?, high streets that are so expensive to rent that only the richest, and therefore blandest of commercial giants can afford to ride out the recession there; bad news for us, especially if you want a great piece of cultural art, which is what a record actually is.
Record stores aren’t selling quirky old artifacts. We’re starting to think of them as quirky and specialist because our greedy high street culture has told us that’s the case.
If they were able to function as commercial premises on our streets then the stuff they sell would flourish, and that doesn’t mean ditching our beloved iPods, It just means owning a great piece of work by our favourite band with a piece of real art on the cover, and something that actually sounds good too. Not bad for the price of two Lattes.” - Johnny Marr
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msbeautifulsorta:

Landlords Stole My Records Off The Street

“To me a record shop isn’t a “specialist” shop , or a thrift store either, it’s just a kind of shop, a very important kind of shop. Record shops were meeting places where you learnt about music, clothes, style and clubs. Everyone in my town who was interesting was in the record shop at some point. There’s so much talk about the death of vinyl versus the download boom as if we all fled away from records because we love our iPods too much, but that isn’t exactly the whole story.

One of the main reasons why vinyl sales have declined is because when we walk down our streets we don’t see any. The greed of local councils and lease owning landlords has meant that our towns and cities have replaced the record shops (and clothes shops) we all liked with over priced sandwich shops and Bistro Bars.

All through the nineties stores that were rented and run by enthusiasts of say, photography and cameras, as well as music, got totally priced out of their premises and livelihoods, and our culture, by councils and landlords with The Next Quid and Starbucks Dollar in their eyes, it wasn’t all the fault of The Megabyte and Pixel, and now what’s left ?, high streets that are so expensive to rent that only the richest, and therefore blandest of commercial giants can afford to ride out the recession there; bad news for us, especially if you want a great piece of cultural art, which is what a record actually is.

Record stores aren’t selling quirky old artifacts. We’re starting to think of them as quirky and specialist because our greedy high street culture has told us that’s the case.

If they were able to function as commercial premises on our streets then the stuff they sell would flourish, and that doesn’t mean ditching our beloved iPods, It just means owning a great piece of work by our favourite band with a piece of real art on the cover, and something that actually sounds good too. Not bad for the price of two Lattes.”

- Johnny Marr


'Nobody Knows' Country Singer Kevin Sharp Dies at Age 43 →

Kevin Sharp is best known for his cover of The Tony Rice Project hit “Nobody Knows,” which spent four weeks at #1 on Billboard’s Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart in January/February 1997. He had two more top five country hits with “She’s Sure Taking It Well” (#3) and “If You Love Somebody” (#4). His debut album was certified Gold by the RIAA and he was nominated nominated for the ACM Top New Male Vocalist in 1997 (he lost to Trace Adkins).

While his debut album was a huge success, his follow-up album tanked and he was dropped by Asylum Records in 1999. He released an independent album in 2005. His final single was released in 2011.


Boise Towne Square Mall — Boise, Idaho

Left: 1986 — Right: 2013